Category Archives: Nigerian dwarf

Breeding Season? Things to look for in a buck!

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Rumor whispering sweet nothings to SunShyn

The whispering winds of winter are drifting in, sending nuances of dried, and sometimes wet, leaf smells into the air from fading autumn. The golden yellows, glowing reds, and sunset oranges have paled to browns now. They no longer dance everywhere–along the street, through the gardens and parking lots, or certainly through the yard–unless a gust happens to dive down from the north. The pasture is brown now, too. The air has a chill to it every time I open the back door. Yes, fall arrived, stayed for a cup of tea, and now winter is inviting herself in without a welcome! The girls are pouting, preggers, and passing the time in front of the round bales, waiting for spring babies. And the bucks? Well, let’s talk about that.

The bucks have not given up. Oh how I applaud their vigor! A wonderful eau de parfum de buck, better known as LOVE, is still in the air and emanating from the buck pen. Of course, with most of the does now pregnant, the only ‘takers’ are not ready to breed quite yet, so I have some frustrated boys right now.  Planning out which buck to breed to which doe got me thinking about the things that are important to me when it comes to choosing bucks for pairings. While we all have some similar things we look for, there are some things that are ‘givens’ when it comes to looking for a good buck.

Disease: A good buck should be tested negative for disease, or if a buckling, he should be from a clean herd. The last thing anyone wants to do is introduce CL / CAE /Johnes or some other disease into their herd.

Genetics: Some people breed for type. Some people breed for production. Either way, genetics play an important role in both of these areas. While it is slightly possible to breed Ugly Daddy to Mediocre Mommy and get a purty little thing with a few good characteristics, it is very improbable. Someone in the mix needs to have some good genetics, and the chances of having good stock increases the better that the parents are in the genetic department. Not only that, but the idea behind improving animals is to find good traits and to lock them in. Outcrosses are good for creating vigor in animals, but in the process, outcrossing brings in a multitude of new genes that have the potential to disrupt any progress already made in your animals.

So what do you? You do research. Put on the glasses, open up the ADGA database, and start Googling (not ogling, Googling) the goats you find that are related to your BEST animals. Try to evaluate traits that need improving in your animals, and use LA scores to find bucks who are related to your animals that are also stronger in those areas than the bucks you have in your herd. Then make a list and keep one eye open (even while you sleep since you never know when the opportunity will present itself) for a buck or buckling that will help you improve and lock in the traits that you have while still adding some vigor.

Dairy animals: I am speaking generally in the area of dairy animals here since I haven’t bred meat producers. To produce dairy animals of good quality, you need to have dairy animals of good quality. While examining those pedigrees, the awards, etc, make yourself acquainted with what all of those **’s and ++’s mean in addition to the VGs and Es. An animal earning a star, etc, or an animal having starred animals in its background, does not guarantee what type of children that animal will produce. What do you look for?

Pictures! Lots of Pictures! And video–if you can find it. If you can get your hands on the actual animals, by all means, go for it! The main goal here is to check out the mammary systems behind the bucks you are looking at–all of the mammary systems. That includes sisters, aunts, mothers, grandmothers, etc, and if those have production records, WONDERFUL! When examining production records, check how long lactations were along with overall data, but keep in mind that records can still be an inaccurate measure; as I always say, “the data is only as good as the milker, the weather, and the feed!”

Linebreeding: This is one way to lock in traits, especially if you have good animals. It’s also a good way to find out if you have hidden problem areas in your animals since they can pop up sometimes in linebred animals. As Keith Harrell once said, linebreeding is the way to truly find out what you have in your herd, especially if you are trying experimental close linebreeding. You might end up with a fantastic foundation animal or something you cull quickly. Either way, choosing the best is again the direction you want to go with this. When looking for a buck, you can always search ADGA to find out who your best producing/winning animals have been; I’m sure someone will have a buck out there out of one of those lines!

Age: Yes, when it comes to goats, age matters. Older bucks are more experienced than younger bucks; they get the job done quicker (unless you have a super Sol like I did last year; he was 3 months old and breeding (successfully) everything under the moon (and sun!)). Older bucks are usually not quite as aggressive with does as some of the younger bucks can be. Younger bucks often get frustrated easily and get rough while trying to figure out what they are doing. They can also frustrate an older doe because sometimes they just can’t figure out how to do the deed; they are all about foreplay, but not sure where to go after that.  A slow groove might sound wonderful to you or me, but to a doe, especially an experienced doe, they may get aggravated if they have to wait more than a minute to ‘finish up,’ especially  if they have been standing, wagging, at the fence all day long. I’ve had does try to finish the job by bringing in another doe to educate Senor “Slow” Goat. I have also had a few try to teach the young man how to take action by ‘showing’ him how to do it, jumping on his back and going through the motions! Both of these techniques usually thwart the young man’s efforts a bit and annoy him, making the whole process take even longer! An older buck doesn’t care one way or the other; the goal is the same, no matter how he gets there.

Essentially, the ‘best’ option would be a buck who has successfully bred at least one doe and produced offspring. Sometimes people will call this a ‘proven’ buck; technically, that is incorrect. He is not a ‘proven’ buck until he has produced excellent daughters who excel in the milk pail and show ring, but we’ll stop there and say that a buck who has produced before and is still intact has at least two things going for him in the reproductive department.  The only thing is that 99.9% of bucks have that same thing going for them if given enough time to mature.

Now, I’m not knocking young bucks. As long as you have time to wait or have a backup if all else fails, by all means, try him out. Good quality bucks need to have a chance to breed to as many does as possible (and to be collected when possible) because it often seems like the really good ones have passed on by the time we realize how great they were. I can also say the same for many older bucks out there who may not have been ‘proven’ in some herds since their daughters haven’t been on milk test or shown.

Color: Bahaha! Some people out there will get annoyed by me mentioning this, but I know many of you love color. Some of you even buy based on color. Personally, I love color just as much as anyone else. When I first started in goats, I oohed and aahed over all of the cute moonspotted babies and blue eyed girls. Thennnnnn… I got over it.

While color can be a beautiful aspect in any species, it should never be a deciding factor for breeding a buck unless you are choosing between A (Gorgeous and Great) and B (Gorgeous and Great) or unless it’s some crazy, once in a lifetime, may never ever be recreated again color–like purple or pink. In that case, go for the blue eyes, purple, and bling if you are into that (and then email me because I might want to buy him after you finish with him!).

Good luck in choosing your bucks! Happy breeding season…

 

 

Geeky Goat Girl on Facebook

We have a new Facebook page dedicated to Geeky Goat Girl. The others will still have info on our farm site, too, but this one will have a few other things related to goats. 🙂

Please give our new page a like and we will be adding fun things goat as time progresses.

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10 Ways to Name a Goat

When you breed registered goats, no matter what type of goat it is, you are generally stuck with the task (which I find fun) of naming the millions (in my goat dreams!) of animals that are born on your farm. Yes, yes, yes, some people let the new owners name the kids. WHY? What’s the fun in that? Picking out names can be such an adventure! Ok, ok. I hear you saying it’s a pain; names are overused and hard to come up with. So, I suggest coming up with as many unique names as possible! Start a goat notebook today, and then you can just whip it out whenever you choose! Remember, names (including your herd name) cannot exceed thirty (30) spaces for ADGA or AGS. (unfortunately, I do have to count more than my goats sometimes!)

After thinking about it, I’ve decided that there are basically only 10 ways to name a goat. Here they are, and no, I didn’t organize them. Some are used more often than others. Everyone has their own preference!

Themes 

Du-DAA-Du-Du-Du-DAAA-Duhhh-Du-Du-Du-DAAA-Duhhhh-Duh-DA-Da-Duh (I’m JUSTTTT geeky enough to see a wookie!) Themes can be based on anything: songs, movies, foods, people, animals, flowers–the list never ends. I name a lot of my animals this way. I use several themes. For instance, I have some ‘nuts’ in my family (they never fall far from the tree, right?) : Acorn, Nutmeg, Butternut, Pistachio, Karuka, Hazelnut. As long as the names stick with the theme SOMEHOW, use them. Be unique. Come up with your own crazy themes.

Cutesy Names

BAHHHHHHH! Angel, Sweetie, Baby, Sugar, Honey, Precious, Cutie Pie– these are all ‘cutesy’ names. I can hear some of you saying, “Oh, but she is such a precious little baby!” That may be very true, and if she’s not going to be having kids and shipping them all over the US then it’s ok (Did you hear that? Yes. If you want to call her Baby, go right on ahead and do it!). However, if you do intend to show, go on milk test, breed for improvement and sell millions (dream big with me) of progeny, then it is wiser to use a unique name. Why? In the US alone, so many goats of various breeds are registered yearly, especially breeds like the Nigerian dwarf, that it is much easier for people to remember your names and identify with a specific animal if the name stands out in some way. So how do you make them stand out? READ ON! There are LOTS of ways.

Shocking / OOAK (one-of-a-kind) Names

When I say choose something unique, I do mean that. However, there are some that we could call ‘oddball’ names. Some of these are quite hilarious, shocking, one-of-a-kind, and some are truly a little scary. In this case, and this is my take on it (please, no tying me up–unless you are Channing Tatum, then by all means, I was a bad girl), if you are going to be showing, you might not want to be the one dragging “Pus Bucket” to the ring when her name is called over the loudspeaker. Even in your backyard, it might not be so comforting to the neighbors to hear you calling for “Spitball” at feeding time. As stated in the prior line of reasoning, this animal may also live on in the pedigrees of many animals, so really think about whether you want that name to possibly be prolific in the history of the breed (and associated with your herdname). Then again, you might be all for that! If names like Big Bloomers, Ear Wax, Gooberpoo, and Mr Pottie Pants appeal to you, then I guess I have to say “GO FOR IT!” Again, your decision.

Funny

Funny goat names are often favorites as long as they aren’t extremely rude or crass. Some pun name examples are: Al O’Moaney (alimony), Amanda Hugnkiss (a man to hug and kiss), Artie Choke (artichoke), Barb E. Cue (barbecue), Barry Shmelly (very smelly), and  Bowen Arrow (bow and arrow). The list goes on and on. One cool thing about funny names it that you could always go back in the pedigree and pick out a name and ‘TwIsT” it to make it a little funny. The whole point is to make it memorable and fun. Who doesn’t remember something if it makes them laugh?

Other Fun Names

Coming up with names can be a lot of fun. You can create palindromes (same forward as backward): Abba, Alila, Izzi, Otto, Neven. Then there’s Amore, Roma, Avid diva, and don’t nod (one of my faves). Hyperbole (exaggeration) can be fun, too: Zero Times Loser and  Neva Sleeps.  Alliteration can also add a bit of flair. It is the repetition of a specific sound in words (Geeky Goat Girl gets it! Get it, gang?). Some examples would be WooWoo Wally or Anna Abi. Even Betty Boop, Ladypep Lollypop, and Skysee Seasky work. If you wanted, you could also use opposites or oxymorons: Found Missing, A Fine Mess, Aging Yuppie, Melted Ice, Mini Jumbo, Rush Hour, Relative Truth. Try making up your own.

Anagrams

These are so much fun to play with. I’m DEFINITELY going to start using these! An anagram is simply jumbling one word to make another. You could take mom and dad’s name and jumble if you wanted, or just jumble one of the names or some other word. Make them funny or serious. Make them opposites. Do whatever you like: Silent (Listen), The Eyes (They See), and Moon Starer (Astronomer). The ultimate would be Toga (Goat) or Rewarding Naif (Nigerian dwarf). By the way, there are only 11683 ways to rearrange Nigerian dwarf!

Try this anagram generator and have some fun!

Important People/Places

This one’s easy, folks! Anyone can play this game. Pick up a history book (if you don’t have one, use the big book of Google!) or an atlas (again, Google or MapQuest will work). Where do you want to go? Who do you want to be? Who do you want to win? Who do you want to destroy? Well, you might not want to use that last one, but you get the point. You could also use movie names or TV names if you wanted.

  • Tom Thumb (yes, there’s a famous Nigerian dwarf)
  • Jumpin’ Jack Flash
  • Reba
  • King Richard
  • Mcconaughey
  • Paris
  • Letterman
  • Washington
  • Arizona
  • Yourup (haha! Europe, get it?) (Yes, I want to go there!)
  • Sanford (been there– Maine, North Carolina, and Florida)

After nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, onomatopoeia 

A noun is a ‘thing’; anything you can think of will work. You can call your buck Cowboy Dan, Stetson, Bootstrap, Sock Puppet, Apple, Butterfly, Robot, etc. Verbs: Accelerate, Appreciate, Enhance, Fine Tune, and more. Active verbs work really well, especially attached to a little phrase like End the Game or Loving It. Adjectives are merely descriptive words you can see, taste, touch, hear, or smell. These also work well in combo with a noun. Stinky Catch is a good one or Blue Boy, Alive and Kicking, Average Girl, Brown Eyed Betty, and Curvy Broad. Adverbs work well with verbs: Just Judy, Joyfully Spun, Almost Late. Onomatopoeia is a ‘sound’ word: BOOM! Crash! BANG! KAPLOWEY! Come up with your own variations. Mix and match!

Songs

These vary so widely that I’m not going to mention any……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Ok. I changed my mind. Here’s a place you can play around and change spellings along with . For example: Reba’s “Rumor Has It” has been used before, but there’s no reason this couldn’t be “You Lie,” which is essentially the same thing. It doesn’t matter if you’re a “Survivor” or not, “Cathy’s Clown” is always going to be around. “What Do You Say?” I know. “If I Had Only Known,” but I was the “Last One to Know, ” and “Still,” “Til You Love Me,” “Fancy,” “Does He Love You?” You could go back through the albums and plan out an entire theme list if you wanted. My late husband really liked Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band along with other music from the 70 and early 80s. Oddly enough, we had a Hollywood Nights out of Midnight Rambler and Bad Moon Rising, which led to Fortunate Son, Jody Girl, and Kathmandu.

Foreign Words

We use some Spanish words here, and I’ve seen lots of people use French words and more in the past. The cool thing is that I’ve seen some people spell the names differently. For instance, we have a Bonita (it means ‘pretty’ in Espanol–Spanish), but then there’s also a Beau-Nita (NC PromisedLand). I’ve seen Mariposa (Butterfly in Spanish), and you could modify that to a MaryPoza if you wanted. The list goes on and on. Parlez vous Francais o habla espanol? German? Italian? Something else? Have fun with it!

I do believe I could keep going here. You could use metaphors, similes, numbers, and other things to name your goats, but I hope the examples above help some. Kidding season is upon us, so I hope this gave you some ideas. START MAKING A LIST AND CHECK IT TWICE. Oh, well, I guess you don’t have to do the second part unless your goats pull a sled, too.

Have an awesome spring kidding season, and share some of those names with me! I promise I won’t steal them (FINGERS CROSSED BEHIND MY BACK).